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United Airlines, Inc.
IATA ICAO Callsign
UA UAL UNITED
Founded April 6, 1926; 90 years ago (1926-04-06) (as Varney Air Lines)[1]
Commenced operations March 28, 1931[2]
AOC # CALA014A[3]
Hubs
  • Antonio B. Won Pat International Airport (Guam)[4]
  • Denver International Airport[4]
  • George Bush Intercontinental Airport (Houston)[4]
  • Los Angeles International Airport[4]
  • Narita International Airport (Tokyo)[4]
  • Newark Liberty International Airport[4]
  • O'Hare International Airport (Chicago)[4]
  • San Francisco International Airport[4]
  • Washington Dulles International Airport[4]
  • Frequent-flyer program MileagePlus
    Airport lounge United Club
    Alliance Star Alliance
    Fleet size 724
    Destinations 342
    Company slogan "Fly the Friendly Skies"
    Parent company United Continental Holdings
    Headquarters Willis Tower, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
    Key people
  • Oscar Muñoz, CEO[5]
  • Scott Kirby, President[6]
  • Robert A. Milton, Chairman[7]
  • Andrew Levy, CFO[8]
  • Julia Haywood, CCO[8]
  • Revenue US$ 37.864 billion (2015)[9]
    Operating income US$ 5.166 billion (2015)
    Net income US$ 7.340 billion (2015)
    Total assets US$ 39.210 billion (2015)
    Total equity US$ 2.396 billion (2015)
    Employees 86,000 (2016)
    Website united.com

    United Continental Holdings, Inc.UnitedUnited Air Lines

    History[edit]

    US$

    US.6

    US.14US.5

    US

    Predecessors[edit]

    Predecessor air carriers that form the present United Airlines include:

    • Boeing Air Transport (formed in 1927, merged into United Airlines in 1931)
    • Capital Airlines (formed in 1936, merged into United Airlines in 1961)
    • Continental Airlines (formed in 1934, merged into United Airlines in 2010)
    • Air Micronesia (formed in 1968 as a division of Continental Airlines, later became Continental Micronesia and merged into Continental Airlines in 2010)
    • New York Air (formed in 1980, merged into Continental Airlines in 1987)
    • Pioneer Airlines (formed in 1939, merged into Continental Airlines in 1955)
    • People Express Airlines (PEOPLExpress) (formed in 1981, merged into Continental Airlines in 1987)
    • Frontier Airlines (formed in 1950, merged into People Express Airlines in 1986)
    • Arizona Airways (formed in 1942, merged into Frontier Airlines in 1950)
    • Central Airlines (formed in 1949, merged into Frontier Airlines in 1967)
    • Challenger Airlines (formed in 1941, merged into Frontier Airlines in 1950)
    • Monarch Airlines (formed in 1946, merged into Frontier Airlines in 1950)
    • Texas International Airlines (formed in 1944 as Trans-Texas Airways (TTa), Continental Airlines merged into Texas Air in 1982, with Texas Air changing its name to Continental)
    • National Air Transport (formed in 1925, merged into United Airlines in 1931)
    • Pacific Air Transport (formed in 1926, merged into United Airlines in 1931)
    • Pan American World Airways (Pan Am) (Formed in 1927, Pacific Division acquired by and merged into United in 1985, Heathrow Airport international traffic rights acquired by and merged into United in 1990. Pan Am was later forced to declare bankruptcy in 1991)
    • Varney Air Lines (formed in 1926, merged into United Airlines in 1931)

    Corporate identity[edit]

    Brand image[edit]

    The Saul Bass livery was updated in 1988 to feature larger lettering on the fuselage, with the rainbow stripes on the side moved down to accommodate the new space.

    Historical logos[edit]

    1973–1993 
    1993–1997 
    1997–2010 
    2010–present 
    Proposed logo used at the announcement of merger with Continental Airlines. Later replaced with current logo.[67] 

    Marketing themes[edit]

    US0,000

    Sponsorships[edit]

    Corporate affairs[edit]

    Headquarters[edit]

    USUS

    Other facilities[edit]

    Environmental strategy[edit]

    Labor[edit]

    Animal transport[edit]

    Cyber security[edit]

    Hubs[edit]

    Current hubs[edit]

    • George Bush Intercontinental Airport – located in Houston, is United's 2nd largest hub. It is the airline's hub for the Southern United States and primary gateway to Latin America (inherited after the merger with Continental Airlines).[97] About 15.8 million passengers depart IAH on United every year, or about 43,300 people per day.[97] United currently has about 78% of the seat share at Bush, making it the airport's largest tenant.[98] Houston was also previously Continental's biggest hub before the United-Continental merger.[99]
    • Chicago O'Hare International Airport – O'Hare is United's Largest hub and its hub for the Midwest. United flies approximately 16.1 million departing passengers through O'Hare every year, which is about 44,000 people per day,[100] making it also the busiest airline at the airport. United's corporate headquarters are also in Chicago.
    • Newark Liberty International Airport – The third largest hub for United in terms of number of flights and destinations and United's primary hub for the East Coast and gateway to Europe, Latin America and Asia (inherited after the merger with Continental Airlines).[101] About 12.2 million passengers depart on United through Newark every year, or about 33,495 people per day.[101] United controls about 81% of the slots at Newark and carries about 68% of all passengers at the airport, making it the airport's largest airline.[102][103] Newark was previously Continental's second biggest hub before the United-Continental merger.[99] United controls all of Terminal C and uses part of Terminal A for United Express Flights.
    • Denver International Airport – The fourth largest hub in terms of number of destinations and flights and United's hub for the central and western United States.[104] United flies approximately 10.3 million departing passengers a year through DIA, which is about 28,333 people per day.[104] As of March 2015, United has about 43.37% of the market share at DIA, making it the airport's biggest airline.[105] DIA was previously United's second biggest hub before the United-Continental merger.[99] Denver is the only domestic hub without service to Europe (although the carrier at one point operated a seasonal service from Denver to Heathrow Airport. Star Alliance partner Lufthansa operates nonstop service to Frankfurt and Munich with a United code share agreement).
    • San Francisco International Airport – The fifth largest hub in terms of number of flights, and sixth biggest in terms of number of destinations, and United's primary hub for the West Coast and gateway to Asia, Europe and Australia.[106] About 10.1 million passengers depart through SFO every year on United, which is about 27,746 people per day.[106] United has about 46.1% of the market share at San Francisco International, making it the biggest airline at the airport.[107] San Francisco was previously United's third biggest hub before the United-Continental merger.[99]
    • Washington Dulles International Airport – The sixth largest hub in terms of number of flights, and fifth biggest in terms of number of destinations, and United's secondary hub for the East Coast and gateway to Europe.[108] United has about 65.2% of the market share at Washington Dulles, making it the largest airline at the airport.[109] About 6.5 million departing passengers fly through Dulles every year on United, which is about 17,824 people per day.[108] Dulles was previously United's fourth biggest hub before the United-Continental merger.[99]
    • Los Angeles International Airport – The seventh largest hub for United in terms of number of destinations and flights and United's secondary hub for the West Coast and gateway to Asia and Australia.[110] About 5.9 million departing passengers fly through LAX on United every year, or about 16,041 people per day.[110] United has about 16.65% of the market share at LAX, making it the third biggest carrier at the airport.[111] LAX was previously United's fifth biggest hub before the United-Continental merger.[99]
    • Guam A. B. Won Pat International Airport – The eighth biggest hub in terms of number of destinations and flights and United's hub for the Pacific (inherited after the merger with Continental Airlines).[96] Guam was previously Continental's fourth biggest hub before the United-Continental merger.
    • Tokyo Narita International Airport – The ninth largest hub in terms of number of destinations and flights and United's hub for Asia.[96] Narita was previously United's sixth biggest hub before the United-Continental merger.[99]

    Former hubs[edit]

    • Cleveland Hopkins International Airport – United Airlines maintained a secondary East Coast hub in Cleveland until 1985, when they began to move the hub to Washington Dulles. By the time the transition finished in 1987, Continental Airlines made the airport its then fifth hub as their first Midwest hub. United kept Cleveland as a hub following the United-Continental merger. Four years after the merger on February 1, 2014, United announced it was dehubbing Cleveland due to the hub not being profitable.[112] The airport was officially dehubbed on June 5, 2014. Other reasons for the dehubbing include the close proximity of the larger hubs of Chicago-O'Hare, Washington-Dulles and Newark, which were bigger hubs, and the lack of any flights out of North America.
    • Miami International Airport – When United bought Pan Am's international routes from Miami to Europe and Latin America in 1991, Miami became a hub for the airline. In May 2004, MIA was dehubbed and United moved its flights to its main hub in Chicago.[113]
    • Stapleton International Airport – Both United and Continental operated hubs from Denver International Airport's predecessor airport, with both hubs lasting from 1972 until the airport closed in 1995. When Stapleton was replaced with DIA, United made the transfer, but Continental decided against keeping a hub in Denver.[114]

    Destinations[edit]

    Overview[edit]

    UA hubs listed by departures including UA Express (Qtr. 4: 2016)
    Rank Airport Flights Destinations
    1 Chicago–O'Hare, Illinois 530[100] 182[100]
    2 Houston–Intercontinental, Texas 496[97] 177[97]
    3 Newark, New Jersey 397[101] 161
    4 Denver, Colorado 372[104] 137[104]
    5 San Francisco, California 275[106] 99[106]
    6 Washington-Dulles, Virginia 215[108] 102[108]
    7 Los Angeles, California 139[110] 56[110]
    8 Guam 30 22
    9 Tokyo–Narita, Japan 18 11

    Africa[edit]

    Asia[edit]

    Australasia[edit]

    Europe[edit]

    Middle East[edit]

    Domestic[edit]

    Codeshare agreements[edit]

    Fleet[edit]

    United Airlines Mainline Fleet
    Aircraft In Service Orders Passengers Ref Notes
    F B E+ E Total
    Airbus A319-100 57 3[139] 8 42 78 128 [140]
    Airbus A320-200 97 12 42 96 150 [141]
    Airbus A350-1000 35[142] TBA Order under review for conversion to Airbus A350-900 and Airbus A330.[143] Deliveries begin in 2018.[144]
    Boeing 737-700 40 12 40 66 118 [145] Order for 65 aircraft converted in November 2016 to 4 737-800s and 61 deferred indefinitely.
    Future conversions to 737 MAX under consideration.[146][147]
    Boeing 737-800 136 4[146] 16 48 90 154 [148]
    16 48 102 166 [149]
    16 54 96 166 [150]
    16 42 108 166 [151] Guam configuration.
    Boeing 737-900 12 20 51 96 167 [152]
    20 42 117 179 [153]
    Boeing 737-900ER 130 20 51 96 167 [152]
    20 42 117 179 [153]
    20 39 120 179 [154]
    Boeing 737 MAX 9 99[155] TBA Deliveries begin in 2018.[156]
    Boeing 747-400 20 12 52 70 240 374 [157] To be phased out by 2018
    Will be replaced by 777-300ER and A350-1000.[158]
    Boeing 757-200 56 16 45 108 169 [159]
    28 42 72 142 [160] United p.s. configuration.
    Boeing 757-300 21 24 57 132 213 [161]
    Boeing 767-300ER 35 6 26 71 80 183 [162] To be reconfigured into 2-class configuration.
    30 49 135 214 [163]
    Boeing 767-400ER 16 39 63 140 242 [164]
    Boeing 777-200 19 32 98 214 344 [165] 266-seat aircraft used for international operations to be reconfigured for domestic use.[166]
    28 102 234 364 [167]
    8 40 110 108 266 [168]
    Boeing 777-200ER 55 8 40 113 108 269 [169] Largest operator of the 777-200ER[citation needed]
    50 72 145 267 [170]
    Boeing 777-300ER 14[155] 60 102 204 366 [171] First delivery launches United Polaris business class on December 1, 2016.
    Boeing 787-8 12 36 70 113 219 [172]
    Boeing 787-9 18 5[155][173] 48 88 116 252 [174] To be delivered through 2017.
    Boeing 787-10 14[155] TBA Deliveries begin in 2018.[175]
    Embraer E175 24[139][147] TBA Aircraft originally ordered by Republic Airways Holdings
    Order taken over by United in November 2016[139][147]
    Total 724 198

    Boeing_787_Dreamliner_battery_problems

    Special liveries[edit]

    Aircraft Livery Registration
    Airbus A320-200 1970s United "Friendship" retro livery N475UA
    Boeing 737-700 Star Alliance livery N13720
    Boeing 737-800 N26210
    N76516
    Boeing 737-900ER March of Dimes partial on current livery N66848
    "Eco-skies" partial on white fuselage N75432
    Continental Retro "Blue Skyways" livery N75435
    Boeing 757-200 Star Alliance livery N14120
    Boeing 767-300ER N653UA
    Boeing 767-400ER N76055
    Boeing 777-200ER N218UA
    N794UA
    N76021
    N77022
    N78017

    Historical fleet[edit]

    United Airlines Retired Fleet[178]
    Aircraft Year retired Replacement Notes
    Boeing 80A 1934 Launch customer (as Boeing Air Transport)
    Boeing 40A 1937 Launch customer (as Boeing Air Transport);[179] also operated by Varney Air Lines
    Boeing 247 1942 Launch customer; all 59 of the base model were built for United[180]
    Ford Trimotor Operated in 1931 on a transcontinental route between New York City and San Francisco.[181]
    Laird Swallow J-5 Single seat biplane used to carry US Air Mail (CAM 5) by predecessor Varney Air Lines.[182]
    Douglas DC-3
    Boeing 377 Stratocruiser 1954
    Douglas DC-7 1964
    Convair 340 1968
    Vickers Viscount 1969 Boeing 727 & 737 Former Capital Airlines aircraft. Only mainline turboprop aircraft type ever operated by United.
    Douglas DC-6 1970
    Sud Aviation Caravelle 1970 Boeing 727 & 737 Only U.S. airline operator of this French-manufactured intermediate range twinjet
    Lockheed L-1011 TriStar[183] 1989 McDonnell Douglas DC-10 Purchased from Pan American World Airways.
    Boeing 720 1976 Boeing 727 Launch Customer.
    Douglas DC-8 1992 Boeing 757-200 Largest DC-8 operator.
    Fleet included stretched DC-8 "Super 60" series (DC-8-61) and re-engined "Super 70" series (DC-8-71) aircraft.
    United accomplished the re-engining of its Super DC-8 aircraft in-house via its maintenance dept. One crashed in 1960 (UA 826).
    Boeing 727-100 1993 Boeing 737-500 Launch customer
    Boeing 747SP 1995 Boeing 747-400 Purchased from Pan American World Airways
    Boeing 747-100 1999 Boeing 777-200/-200ER
    McDonnell Douglas DC-10 2001 Boeing 777-200/-200ER Launch Customer. Fleet included original DC-10-10 variant and larger, longer range DC-10-30 variant. One crashed in 1989.
    Boeing 747-200 2000 Boeing 747-400
    Boeing 727-200 2001 Airbus A320 family
    Boeing 737-200 2001 Airbus A320 family Launch customer
    Boeing 737-300 2009 Airbus A320 family
    Boeing 737-500[184] 2009, 2013 Airbus A320 family,
    Boeing 737-900ER
    The United 737-500 and 767-200ER fleet had been retired by 2009 and 2005, respectively. The 737-500s and 767-200ERs inherited from the merger with Continental Airlines were disposed of by 2013. One 767-200 crashed during the September 11 attacks (UA 175).
    Boeing 767-200ER[185] 2005, 2013 Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner

    Cabin[edit]

    United Polaris First[edit]

    United Polaris FirstUnited Polaris First

    United Polaris Business[edit]

    United Polaris Business

    Other domestic routes, especially hub-to-hub service and certain non "United p.s." transcontinental flights regularly see internationally configured aircraft with BusinessFirst (and sometimes GlobalFirst) for operational reasons (such as transferring international aircraft from one hub to another). While the physical seats and entertainment are the same as on international flights, the service, catering and other amenities are the same as in domestic first class. Unlike routes marketed as "BusinessFirst" and United p.s., these flights are eligible for complimentary premier upgrades.

    United p.s.[edit]

    p.s.

    United First and United Business[edit]

    United FirstUnited Business

    Economy Plus[edit]

    United Economy Plus

    Economy Class[edit]

    United Economy

    Frequent flyer services[edit]

    MileagePlus[edit]

    United Club[edit]

    The United Club is the airline lounge associated with United Airlines and United Express carriers. United Clubs feature snacks, hot foods, beverages, and many areas to relax. The United Club replaced the former United Red Carpet Club and Continental Airlines Presidents Club prior to the merger with Continental.

    Subscriptions[edit]

    Among United's subscriptions that passengers pay an annual fee for:

    • Free bag check annual subscription[200]
    • Economy Plus access annual subscription[200]

    Accidents and incidents[edit]

    1930s NC13304 Flight 6 Flight 4[201] NC13323[202] NC13355[203]
    1940s Flight 521 Flight 608 Flight 624
    1950s Flight 129 Flight 610 Flight 615 Flight 409 Flight 629 Flight 718 Flight 736
    1960s Flight 826 Flight 859 Flight 297 Flight 823 Flight 389 Flight 227 Flight 266
    1970s Flight 553 Flight 2860 Flight 173
    1980s Flight 811 Flight 232 Flight 2885
    1990s Flight 585 Flight 826
    2000s Flight 175 Flight 93
    2010s Flight 929

    See also[edit]

    • Air transport in the United States
    • Transportation in the United States

    References[edit]

    Bibliography[edit]

    • Bennett, Drake (February 2, 2012). "Making the World's Largest Airline Fly". Bloomberg Businessweek. New York: Bloomberg. 
    • Davies, Ed (January–February 2007). "Boeing's Airline: The Life and Times of Boeing Air Transport: Part One". Air Enthusiast. No. 127. pp. 64–74. ISSN 0143-5450. 
    • Davies, Ed (March–April 2007). "Boeing's Airline: The Life and Times of Boeing Air Transport: Part Two". Air Enthusiast. No. 128. pp. 62–73. ISSN 0143-5450. 
    • Petzinger Jr., Thomas (1995). Hard landing. New York: Three River Press. ISBN 0-8129--2835-0. 

    External links[edit]

    Wikimedia Commons has media related to United Airlines.
    • United Airlines travel guide from Wikivoyage
    • Official website (Mobile)
    • Film of United Airlines Boeing 247 NC13364 taking off from Vancouver Airport 1934
    • UAL.com Official website archive
    • Hemispheres inflight magazine
    • United Vacations
    • United Media Services
    • United Continental Merger

    Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Airlines



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